Woman is blamed by this man who says her outfit attracts rape. She has the perfect reply

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Source: Laurah Lukin/Facebook

After experiencing the effects of rape culture firsthand, a woman named Laurah Lukin is speaking out.

Laurah Lukin is a jogger, and her Facebook page is filled with photos of her exercising and running marathons. In a post that has since gone viral, Laurah describes one of these events, writing:

“This past Sunday, I ran a half marathon. It was a great day. I raced with my friends. We all ran well. I set a goal for myself and exceeded it. My husband and daughter cheered for me at the finish line.”

Source: Laurah Lukin/Facebook

She continues, “This morning I woke up to a notification that I was tagged in a race photo on Facebook. Interested to see how the day had been captured, I clicked it and was left speechless by several comments from a man I do not know.”

“That’s because she doesn’t have any damn clothes on and she’s running for her life…. No wonder joggers get raped.”

Laurah, a co-founder of LaoTong, a “community that unites and empowers women through running”, took to her website to discuss the comments more thoroughly.

Laurah wrote:

“Instantly, my brain started rationalizing and justifying my race outfit.

It was a race!

They are competition briefs!

They make me cool and faster!

My legs move more freely!

They’re funny!

Then I paused. I was immediately disappointed that my gut reaction to this man’s horrific comments was to defend my wardrobe choice. After all, there were photos from the race of shirtless men, men in short shorts, men in tight shorts; yet he did not feel motivated to comment on their potential for inviting sexual assault.

I was tempted to write an angry response to his comment to “put him in his place”. While such a retort would surely ease my ego, I knew it would probably not influence his opinions.

“There were photos from the race of shirtless men, men in short shorts, men in tight shorts, yet he did not feel motivated to comment on their potential for inviting sexual assault.”

She continues, in bolded text, “It is not my responsibility to choose a race outfit or workout apparel to deter the temptation of men. The length of my shorts is not an indication of interest, invitation, or consent.

“By labeling or accusing the victim, others can see the victim as different from themselves. People reassure themselves by thinking, “Because I am not like her, because I do not do that, this would never happen to me.’ […]

“Victim-blaming attitudes marginalize the victim/survivor and make it harder to come forward and report the abuse. If the survivor knows that you or society blames her for the abuse, s/he will not feel safe or comfortable coming forward and talking to you.”

Most (progressed) people agree

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