‘Take My Wife’ needs a platform and fans are trying to save it

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It is one of few shows with a diverse writers’ room and staff. And it doesn’t play into the ‘bury your gays’ trope.

Name a more iconic duo WHATS THAT THEYRE STANDING RIGHT BTWN US #takemywife

A post shared by Cameron Esposito (@cameronesposito) on


After the streaming service that hosted the LGBTQ-positive show Take My Wife announced it would shut down, fans have been urging other platforms to take the show. For days, #TakeMyWife has been trending on Twitter.

The show has offered LGBTQ representation and representation of actors of color that effectively raised the bar for other television shows. Take My Wife is about the relationship between two comedians married to each other. Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher play fictionalized versions of themselves. The show focuses on the challenges of being a comedian, being in a relationship, and being in a relationship with a fellow comedian. The show considers the tension in a relationship between an experienced comic and a new comic.

Take My Wife is about the relationship between two comedians married to each other. Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher play fictionalized versions of themselves. The show focuses on the challenges of being a comedian, being in a relationship, and being in a relationship with a fellow comedian. The show considers the tension in a relationship between an experienced comic and a new comic.

Its creators, stars, and showrunners, Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher, have completed a second season of their deeply personal, semi-autobiographical show—but they have nowhere to show it.

Though Esposito and Butcher have overseen every aspect of their critically acclaimed comedy about a couple of L.A.-based comedians, as Butcher sadly confirms to Vanity Fair “we don’t own it. . . . If it doesn’t find a new home, we can’t release it ourselves.” In other words, if she and Esposito can’t find a new platform for the episodes that are already done and dusted, the second season of the politically relevant and utterly charming Take My Wife may never see the light of day.

“In this world it is easy to believe that you cannot make a difference; that when a government or an institution or corporation makes a decision, there is something irrevocable about the decision; that love is always less important than the bottom line,”

Wachowski wrote at the time.

“But here is a gift from the fans of this show that I will carry forever in my heart: while it is often true those decisions are irreversible, it is not always true. Improbably, unforeseeably, your love has brought Sense8 back to life. I could kiss every single one of you!”

The show’s writer’s room and the cast are very diverse. It is rare that a writer’s room is exclusively made up of women, 43 percent of whom were women of color in the second season, in an industry that is so dominated by white straight men. Fifty-four percent of the actors in the cast belonged to the LGBTQ community.

As fictional lesbian characters continue to drop like flies on TV shows like The 100,The Walking Dead, Orange Is the New Black, and Game of Thrones, Take My Wifeoffers an alternative to what Esposito describes as “the endless coming out/falling in love/dying cycle” in which gay women onscreen too often find themselves trapped.

Source: Vanity Fair

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